4 Rooms in Your Home That Could Use a Fire Extinguisher

Posted by on Mar 30, 2016 in Uncategorized |

If you keep a working fire extinguisher in your home, you might be thinking that you’ve done all your need to be able to control a fire. The reality, however, is that larger homes (and certain state regulations) often mean that one fire extinguisher is not enough. While it’s overkill to have one device in every room, the reality to keep in mind is that if a fire breaks out somewhere in your home, you might not be able to retrieve your fire extinguisher from a distant room until the fire has spread. Here are four rooms that can benefit from a fire extinguisher. Garage Your garage is a valuable spot to store a fire extinguisher. Not only will it not look out of place alongside tools and outdoor equipment, but it can also be a valuable ally if you’re continuously working on projects in your garage. Many garage projects, such as soldering and welding, can create sparks that could possibly lead to a fire. Coupled with the fact that garages often have flammable products such as oil, it’s beneficial to ensure that a fire extinguisher is easily accessible in this space. Kitchen Sure, a fire extinguisher won’t match your kitchen decor, but you need to remember that a fire can easily start in your oven, on your stove or even in your toaster. You want to have a fire extinguisher close at hand, so keeping one in the kitchen is ideal. If you want to be subtle about its location, consider mounting it to the inside of one of your bottom cupboards; it won’t be a visual distraction but will be within easy reach. Basement Having a wood-burning fireplace in the basement is ideal because the heat can rise and flow throughout your entire home. However, there risk of a fire getting out of control is always nearby when you have a fireplace; all it takes is for a hot ash to land on a carpet and not be noticed, and you could soon have a smoldering mess. A fire extinguisher nearby can help you deal with the fire before it spreads. Backyard Shed Although not technically a room in your home, your backyard shed is on your property and your responsibility. If you can identify any potential fire hazards in this location, it’s ideal to keep a fire extinguisher handy. For example, if you’re filling your lawnmower with gas and it ignites, there won’t be time to run to the house to retrieve your fire extinguisher. For more information, contact companies...

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How Can You Tell If Your Home Needs A Sewer Cleaning?

Posted by on Mar 30, 2016 in Uncategorized |

Sewer problems are common in older households, but all homes may need sewer cleaning from time to time. As a homeowner, you’re responsible sewer lines that connect to your property. Being able to tell when your home needs a sewer line cleaning can help you avoid disastrous problems. How can you tell if your home needs a sewer line cleaning? If your home needs a sewer cleaning, there may or may not be warning signs. Some of the signs to look for include Sinks and bathtubs drain slowly all over the house. If one drain is slow, this is likely because of a clog in that specific drain. If all of your drains are slow, this is a sign that the sewer line needs to be cleaned. Flushing water down one drain causes water to rise somewhere else. If flushing your toilet causes waste water to appear in your bathtub, for example, this is a sign that the sewer line is clogged. Strange gurgling noises in your drains. When the sewer line needs to be cleaned, you may hear sounds you didn’t used to hear when flushing waste water down the drain. Presence of a sewer gas odor in the house. If you smell sewer gas in your home, this could be a sign that the sewer line is backing up. (This could also be a sign that water has evaporated out of a P-trap somewhere in your home, so don’t panic at the first hint of a bad odor.) If your home is displaying one or more of the above warning signs, contact a certified plumber right away. The plumber will be able to tell you for sure if your home needs a sewer linecleaning. How often should you get the sewer lines cleaned? Every property is different. If members of your household frequently flush adult wipes or kitty litter down the toilet, you’ll need to get your sewer line cleaned more often than a household that does not. If your property has many deep-rooted trees growing near your sewer line, this will also necessitate frequent sewer line cleaning. What can happen if you fail to get a sewer line cleaning on time? If you fail to get a sewer line cleaning when one is needed, the sewer can backup into your home. This could be a minor event that results in raw sewage in your bathtub, or this could be an expensive problem that results in a layer of raw sewage all over your basement floor. Can you clean the sewer lines yourself? There are some DIY chemical cleaning products available at home improvement centers that will kill and remove tree roots from the sewer lines, however,...

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How Not To Suffocate Your Log Home With The Wrong Kind Of Stain This Spring

Posted by on Mar 30, 2016 in Uncategorized |

Homeowners and concerned children are equally and acutely aware of the fact that houses creak and groan at night, and this phenomenon has a lot to do with the temperature shift that occurs during this time. These noises are caused by the lumber in your walls, ceiling, and other areas “breathing” with the temperature shift, which is an important part of your home’s health. The same is true in log cabins, and in fact, this phenomenon can be even more important than in a stick built home, especially during the extreme temperature differences that often come in springtime. Picking the right stain is crucial to allowing your log home to breathe with the temperature changes, so here are some tips on choosing a stain for your log cabin with this in mind.  First Off, No Paint When was the last time you saw a painted log cabin? Exactly, never. That’s because paint is the worst finish for letting your log cabin breathe the way it’s supposed to. Paint is very rigid and stiff, especially exterior paint designed for shingles and paneling, which is why it can chip after a few years. Apply this kind of paint to a large log that may grow or shrink by several percent over the course of a year, and you’ve got a recipe for disaster, and a shoddy staining job to boot.  Oil-Based Stains Aren’t Much Better Even if you know enough to pick a stain over a paint, you may still not be out of the woods yet. That’s because oil-based paints can be just as bad as paint, since they’re both made of essentially the same ingredients. Oil-based stains won’t let your home breathe, either, which can cause chips, cracks, and drafts if left unchecked.  Latex-Based Stains Now that you know which finishes to avoid, there’s really only one option left: latex-based stain. This type of stain is ideal for log homes because it is the most elastic and dynamic, meaning that a latex-based stain will be able to stretch and shrink with a log rather than providing the brittleness that comes with an oil-based stain. An added bonus to latex is that most latex stains can act as a somewhat protective barrier if you really need to bulk up your log home’s seal in a hurry, and since latex is so dynamic, this seal will form and stay tight for years. Click here for more information on log home...

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