Is Natural Hardwood Flooring An Option For Your Kitchen?

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

For many homeowners, a natural hardwood floor can be a daunting option to maintain. However, the charm and timeless nature of hardwood flooring ensures its popularity. Bedrooms and living rooms are expected locales, but can hardwood floor find a place in your kitchen? The answer may surprise you. Ask yourself the following questions and determine whether you should consider hardwood flooring in your kitchen. Do you have a regular cleaning or maintenance routine? Hardwood floors are famously fragile in many ways. If you are the type of homeowner who neglects to sweep at least weekly or wipe up spills immediately in the kitchen, hardwood floors may not be the right choice for you. Water damage can ruin your floors easily, and without proper cleaning, the wood’s condition will quickly deteriorate. If, on the other hand, you do keep a regular maintenance routine, being willing to perform basic upkeep, including weekly sweeping and quarterly polishing, this points to hardwood as a possibility for you. Lessen the possibility of spills by using rugs or mats in danger areas like the sink or under a dining table or counter. What level of the building is your kitchen on? Hardwood (solid wood, in particular) can react poorly to moisture and dampness. In a kitchen, the obvious culprit for this is accidental spills, but what you may fail to consider is the climate of the level you are on. Basements, for example, tend towards dampness, and so if your kitchen is located in the basement, you may want to consider stone or laminate flooring options instead. Otherwise, make a note of the climate and humidity changes in the part of the house your kitchen is, and plan accordingly. What is your budget? Hardwood flooring is among the more expensive flooring options. If you find yourself wanting to save money on flooring, there are superior options for doing so. Additionally, moving ahead with hardwood in a kitchen is simplest with a highly-textured species of wood. This will prevent small dings and scratches from the constant use from being as noticeable. However, it may well skyrocket your costs, depending on personal preference. Research various options, such as oak or ash, and their costs within this realm before committing to going for hardwood floors. Did you answer the questions positively? If so, hardwood flooring might be a workable investment to bring your kitchen’s aesthetics to a new level. Visit websites like http://www.carrollfloor.com for more...

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Comparing Heating Methods For Your Vacation Cabin

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

You’re finally achieving your dream of building a cabin by the lake and are drawing up the final design plans. You’ll have several choices when it comes to how you’ll heat your cabin. If you’re interested in a rustic approach, a wood-burning stove may be your preferred option. But if you’d like something a little more modern, here are some other choices to consider. A heating service can advise you as to the best options in the area where your cabin resides. Gas Furnace This furnace uses gas filled tubes that, when ignited, produce flames to heat the air in an exchange box. Once the air is hot enough, it is circulated through the cabin using a blower to push the air through a number of vents. Natural gas from a pipeline to the house is used with most furnaces. If natural gas is not available in the area, propane gas can be delivered to the cabin and stored in large tanks on the property. Except for changing the filter, maintenance of a gas furnace should be done by a heating repair service. Electric Furnace This furnace uses electric coils to heat the air in the exchange box. A blower distributes the warm air through the cabin. As with the gas furnace, you can change the filter but should leave other maintenance to the heating service. Oil Furnace This furnace produces a fine mist of heating oil which is sent to a burner and ignited in a combustion chamber. The chamber heats the air which is circulated through the cabin. The oil to air ratios in the burner must be precise, so all maintenance should be left to an oil furnace heating specialist. This may be an option in parts of the country where heating oil is less expensive than gas and electricity. Heat Pumps This uses no fuel and heats your cabin by drawing heat into it from the ground. Condenser coils are used to compress the heat, making it warmer, before it is sent through the cabin. Heat pumps are useful in areas where the temperatures are mild throughout the year. If the temperatures ever get to freezing, a backup oil, gas or electric system is useful. Hydronic Heating Grids of tubes are placed under the floor in your cabin. Warm water from your water heater or another heater is circulated through the tubes. This warms the air near the floor which slowly rises to warm the rest of the room. Unlike the forced air furnaces, the room is warmed evenly with no hot or cold spots. A heating service needs to install this type of heat because there will be different requirements for the floor material...

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Parking Bumpers: Concrete, Rubber, Or Plastic?

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Parking bumpers, curb stops, wheel stops, parking blocks, bumper blocks–whatever you call them, these ubiquitous structures are an important element of any parking lot and can be found in many other areas as well. They direct drivers to parking stalls, provide an indication of how far one should pull into a space, and create a barrier between cars and other objects such as signs. If you are in the market for parking bumpers, it’s a good idea to look into the top three types–concrete, rubber, and plastic–and understand the pros and cons of each. Concrete Pros Concrete parking bumpers come in several size option, ranging from sizes that work for standard-sized vehicles to extra-large bumpers for use in areas that see a lot of semi-truck traffic. Because of their weight, concrete bumpers tend to stay in place better than other materials. Concrete bumpers last a long time, making them a cost-effective option.  Concrete Cons Concrete bumpers are the heaviest of the three options, making them the most difficult to move, often requiring heavy machinery. In addition, concrete can break during the moving process, posing a hazard to movers and other individuals in the area. Concrete is susceptible to salt or ice melt, so if you live in an area with extreme cold weather during part of the year, it may not be the best option. Concrete doesn’t come in colors, so if your parking bumpers need to be colored, they must be painted. ​Rubber Pros Similar to plastic, rubber bumpers are relatively lightweight, making them easy to handle. Rubber bumpers are available in multiple sizes and UV-resistant colors.  If being eco-friendly is important to you, you can purchase rubber bumpers made from recycled tires.  Rubber stands up well to salt and ice melt. Rubber is more gentle than concrete or plastic on vehicle tires. Rubber Cons Rubber bumpers tend to be higher priced than concrete, but less expensive than recycled plastic bumpers.  The light weight of rubber bumpers can be a problem when vehicles hit them, unless you invest in hardware to pin them down. Plastic Pros Plastic parking bumpers can be ordered in several UV-resistant colors that will last without fading, chipping, or cracking. Plastic holds up well against salt and ice melt, making it ideal for cold weather conditions. The light weight of plastic bumpers makes them easy to transport. Plastic Cons According to plastic bumpers have a tendency to bow or curl after several seasons of use and exposure to the elements. Their light weight makes it necessary to purchase extra hardware to anchor them to the ground so they can withstand being hit by vehicles. Recycled plastic has the highest price of all three bumper...

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Prepare For The End: Fortify Your Home

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

If movies, books and television are any indication, the end of the world could be coming anytime. There is no way to know whether the problem will be disease, natural disasters or war. However, you can fortify and strengthen you home to make sure that it can stand up against the forces against it. Exterior Fortifications First, you will want to strengthen the structure of your home. Getting a new, strong roof is the first and most costly step. However, once you install a metal roof on your home you won’t have to worry about it for 50 or more years. Galvanized steel is better at withstanding damage from: Fire Hail  Strong Winds Impact – such as trees or power lines falling on it A metal roof is going to fortify your home better because there are no weak links in it. If your asphalt roof gets a wet spot, or is damaged by a falling tree, then the weakness will spread and eventually weaken the entire roof. Tempting as it may be to repair and replace your own asphalt roof, don’t do it. If you are serious about making your home strong, hire a roofing contractor to install a metal roof. Second, protect your windows. There are two ways that you can protect your windows, and thus your home. You could install impact-resistant windows, or get a shutter system installed in your home. When looking in windows recognize that a triple-pane window is going to be stronger (and more expensive) then a double or single-pane window. You have to decide what level of protection makes you feel safe. Interior Fortifications Having a supply of water and food is the next step of preparing for catastrophe. You may be safe inside your strongly-fortified home, but if you don’t have the necessities for your body, you will not last long. You can purchase large 50-gallon water jugs with pumps. You could also fill old juice or 2-liter soda bottles with water and keep them in your basement. Bleach, or water purification tables are important to have to make sure that if you do need to use the water, that it will be safe to drink. Only store food that you know how to eat. Having bags of whole wheat won’t do you a lot of good unless you are able to grind it and know how to use it to make bread. Beans and noodles are great for food storage because the keep for a long time and are fairly easy to cook for a meal. Finally, make sure that you have some way to cook your food. That may mean having a supply of wood for a wood stove or...

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3 Non-Roofing Maintenance Tasks To Preserve Your Roof This Winter

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

When you think about having roofing maintenance done on your roof, you probably think about things like inspecting your shingles and looking for possible leaks. Although it’s obviously important to do these things as well, you might be surprised by the other routine maintenance tasks that can help keep your roof in good condition. To help ensure that your home is ready for the winter season, make sure that you perform these three non-roofing maintenance tasks to preserve the top of your home during the cold months. 1. Clean Your Gutters Cleaning your gutters is critical if you want to keep your roof in good condition over the winter. If rain and melted ice or snow can’t run off of your roof easily, then it can easily freeze on top of your home. This can cause excess weight, which can cause problems with your roofing. Plus, the precipitation can melt and cause water leaks, which can damage both your roof and the things that you keep inside of your home. 2. Trimming Trees You don’t just have to worry about your trees during the springtime. To help prevent your roof from getting damaged, make sure that you have dead limbs trimmed off of any nearby trees before the winter hits. These limbs can cause problems at any time, but the problems can become even more prevalent as these limbs become weighed down with icicles and snow. 3. Insulate Your Attic Floors If your attic isn’t well-insulated already, then it’s a good idea to have the job done before the temperature changes. Keeping your attic well-insulated won’t just help you cut down on those dreaded, expensive winter heating bills; it can also help prevent ice dams from forming on top of your roof, which could otherwise cause severe damage, such as a roof collapse. Along with following these tips for preparing your home for the winter, it’s also a good idea to hire a roofing contractor to come out and perform an inspection. He or she can make sure that your roof is in good condition and can perform any necessary maintenance and repairs, which will help keep your home and your family safe during the cold winter months. Plus, your roofing professional may be able to give you other tips for preparing your home for the upcoming season, which can help preserve your roof and the rest of your...

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